“Extreme” Poverty Findings

According to a recent article published by Philanthropy News Digest, “A report from the World Bank estimates that the percentage of people living in extreme poverty around the globe will fall below 10 percent by the end of the year,” (World Bank Sees ‘Extreme’ Poverty Falling Below 10 Percent).

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The report, entitled Ending Extreme Poverty and Sharing Prosperity: Progress and Policies, consisted of 83 pages and projected that the number of people living below an updated international poverty line would fall 9.6 percent this year. With an international poverty line standing at $1.90 a day, the number of people living in these circumstances will drop from 902 million in 2012, to 702 million this year.

This decrease in “extreme” poverty, according to the report, is mainly due to strong economic growth and a multitude of investments in education, health, and social safety nets, which have collaboratively assisted around a billion people out of poverty starting early in the 21st century. However, it’s important to note that:

“At the same time, extreme poverty has become more concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa, where nearly half the global poor live, even as the extreme poverty rate in the region fell from an estimated 56 percent in 1990 to a projected 35 percent in 2015. Another third of the globe’s extremely poor are concentrated in South Asia, where the extreme poverty rate is projected at 13.5 percent, down from 50.6 percent in 1990,” (World Bank Sees ‘Extreme’ Poverty Falling Below 10 Percent).

It is vital in determining whether or not poverty levels have dropped significantly or barely at all through the use of statistical data processed over the years.

Further improvements to aid in the decline of extreme poverty will be catered towards sustainability and the development of how and when to reach specific goals. Also, more statistical analysis will be used to see unevenness in shared prosperity, disparities in dimensions of development, and access to health services and quality education. Though we have seen a somewhat significant decrease in extreme poverty globally, certain target areas will need further improvements.

In conclusion, we, as a global nation, are making significant strides to eliminate the amount of poverty in the world today. This is a big deal. As World Bank president Jim Kong Kim said, “This is the best story in the world today – these projections show us that we are the first generation in human history that can end extreme poverty,” (World Bank Sees ‘Extreme’ Poverty Falling Below 10 Percent).

 

Fundraising for Philanthropy

Scot UlmerWhether you are an active member of a philanthropy or you run one – there are many ways you can contribute to fundraising for your cause.

Fundraising for philanthropy is a great way to not only connect people throughout your community, but to educate those around you about your charity – that could be as specific as raising money for hospital funds that will go to one of your relatives in need, or for a widely-recognized philanthropy such as the Susan G. Koman Breast Cancer Foundation.

Here are some helpful tips you can use to raise money for whichever philanthropy you are passionate about:

First, whenever you are raising awareness for a cause, make sure to be creative. Nobody ever wants to be harassed in the middle of the street in New York City on their way to work. Instead, be appealing and use your resources.

Making an announcement at work, or sending out an email to those you think would be interested is a great way to let people know that you want them to attend your fundraising event – but only if they want to. Never force somebody into donating money, because chances are they won’t want to donate to your cause again.

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Next, try to get children involved in your fundraising event. There’s nothing that people love seeing more than innocent children (though they may not always be so innocent) making an effort to learn and care about a certain charity. Try hosting an arts and crafts session for children that helps children learn about a cause while simultaneously giving them creative freedom to have fun and partake in the arts.

For example, if you are an advocate for heart health and cardiovascular disease, one of the leading causes of death in the United States, host an arts and crafts project where children (parents) donate 5-10 dollars and in turn get to make paintings of hearts – these could even be donated to a nearby hospital!

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Another great way to help raise money for your philanthropy is to promote good health by holding a sports competition or race at a local high school or infamous landmark in your town. A basketball tournament is always a great way to get the community together for friendly basketball games. Plus, who doesn’t love watching the local dentist get called for a double dribble?

In conclusion, there are many ways you can help raise money for your philanthropy, but having fun with it will always end in a better turnout and outcome for your event. Good luck!

What is Watsi?

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As our society develops into more and more of an online, tech-savvy world, often, we get distracted by the likes and notifications and forget to notice the true beauty of how technology can help save lives. Online websites and profiles have helped people around the world get the medical attention they need through various funding efforts and awareness. One platform that comes to mind is Watsi, but what is Watsi?

Watsi is an online platform founded in 2012 by Chase Adam, a Peace Corps volunteer, that helps provide medical care to individuals who need it, despite their income or medical situation. Adam came up with the idea of this technology-driven philanthropy when he was traveling through Watsi, Costa Rica, by bus and was witness to a woman on the bus asking for donations to help pay for her son’s medical care – which as we know, can be extremely expensive. When Adam returned to the states, he used Kiva, a crowdfunding website, as a model for creating an online platform that was easily usable and accessible to help low-cost, high-impact medical treatments for people who need the help.

Often used by citizens of underdeveloped or developing countries, the web platform caters to a wide range of needs – from setting broken bones back in place, to removing a complex brain tumor. According to an article published by Philanthropy News Digest, “To be considered for funding, a patient must have an injury or condition that, if left untreated, will severely affect his or her quality of life,” (Watsi). Once a patient is considered for funding, the Watsi team (which is based in San Francisco) helps find a doctor, donor, or anything related to the specific injury, that can help the patient out. Over the years, Watsi has partnered with the African Mission Healthcare Foundation, Project Medishare, and the Children’s Surgical Center in Cambodia, along with other highly recognized web platforms like Google, Dropbox, and Periscope to help assist with funding and medicinal needs.

Since September 1st, 2015, more than 13,400 donors have provided assisted healthcare for over 4,800 patients around the world. Also, according to Philanthropy News Digest, “The Watsi team offers a guarantee that 100 percent of any donation will support the procedure toward which it has been given” (Watsi). Watsi is an incredible example of how our predominantly technologically-driven world can be used for the benefit of humanity. Other online platforms should look to Watsi as an example of a well-thought-out, and well-received, web source that points to where the future of technological innovation should be heading.